Photo Credit: Radomes by Ren L’Ecuyer

Excerpts from videos by Seabe33 and Clearcutter01 on YouTube

Turn Down Your Computer’s Volume

The video clip on the left starts LOUD. It is actually a shortened version of two excellent YouTube videos that are reminiscent of how life was in the Rayonier Canada Holberg Logging camp way back in the mid-seventies. Unfortunately, I took very few pictures or videos back in those days, so some images on this page come from other sources.

Thanks to public domains like YouTube, Flickr, etc., it is now possible for sappy sentimentalists like me to piece together pages that awaken old memories and evoke long forgotten feelings about places like Holberg.  My plan is to continue adding additional videos and pictures as they become available and as time permits.

If you happen to possess any Holberg Camp images that you’d like to see posted here, send an email to holbergsurvivor@gmail.com and we’ll get started.

These days, there are less than 200 people living in the area.  This compares to a total population of probably more than 2000 when both the base and logging camp were going strong.
Official "Welcome to Holberg" Sign

 

The Holberg Suburbs,

Dock, and Dump

(2006)

 

Gallery Introduction

Some time during the late sixties or early seventies, several old houses were moved from Port Alice and relocated to Holberg, where they became residences for families on 3rd & 4th Avenue.  When I was a kid, I thought they were ugly. Now that I, too, have grown old, I would prefer to describe them as “picturesque heritage houses.” The images that follow the residential area include a number of images of the dock and log dump.

The Gallery

Logging Equipment

Some hidden photographic gems (not my own) of some heavy duty equipment, as posted by Nick Thompson, photographer 

Some Great Videos, as posted elsewhere:

The first two, by Seabe33 and Clearcutter01 on YouTube, were used in the introductory clip at the top of this page.

  • fallingafirtree
  • fattrucksofpowellriver1
  • loggersdvdeextract1
  • fatcedarload2
  • bigtrucksinthecanadianwest

5 Comments

  1. Don Albert

    I worked in Holburg in 1969 logging for Macmillan blodell, I believe the boss a that till was Al Clark. It was a great experience for a New Brunswick boy. There was quite a few New Brunswick lads out there.

    Reply
  2. Heather

    Hello Gary, We lived in Rayonier logging camp from 1967-1972. We had just gotten married and it was a new adventure for us. My husband (Roy) was in training to be a heavy duty mechanic and his boss was Horace Arthurs (Master Mechanic). We lived above the shop in a trailer…our neighbors were Erickson’s, Lundy’s and glendennings! Two years later we were moved into one of the new houses that were brought in from port Alice. We were the second house on third ave….the first house was the fire Marshall Ted Maguessen and the other side was Kenny Deyer

    We drove up in September it was a sad trip….most of the houses are not lived in and being claimed back to the forest. We stopped at the pub and was told that only 32 people still lived in camp and the rest of the loggers went home for the weekend….the cookhouse is gone and the men eat at the pub! The two things that remain the same is the gravel road in and of course the constant rain.

    I’ve been trying to place you with your family……your last name please?

    Heather & Roy Spensley

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Al Clark was the woods boss. In 71-72 when I was there

    Reply
  4. Anne Frances Wilson

    My dad was Murray Solvey, and he worked for WFP as a parts manager for their vehicles back in the late 70s. I’m sorry that I can’t be more specific, but I was a bit busy with our young family down in metro Vancouver during the time that Mom and Dad were up in Holberg and I never did ask him for any details about his work there. I can tell you this – my dad was living his dream! I never did remember him happier than when he was living and working in Holberg. He loved the outdoors! He loved the bush! Living in Holberg, he could come home after work and pull his boat to the nearest launch and go fishing whenever he wanted! The one time that that my husband and I visited with our toddlers he took me out on the water with him and the memory of the huge grin on his face stays with me to this day. I had grown up with 2 brothers in Kelowna and my parents had lived there for about for about 25 years so Mom was not quite as happy about being isolated in a north island logging camp, but she settled in to her new circumstances as as best she could.

    Unfortunately, we lost dad to a tragic boating accident in November of 1981. He had gone ducking hunting with 3 other men further up the island and they were traveling in two zodiacs. The story that we heard was that there was warning of a big storm and someone from Holberg contacted the hunters to tell them to either head home immediately or hunker down until the storm passed. The men made the wrong decision. Dad and his boat mate battled their way home and dad actually touched the beach at San Jose Bay but when the two men looked behind them they could not see their two friends so they launched the zodiac back into the bay to attempt a rescue. The details of the accident were described by the other man in dad’s boat because we never did see dad again. His body has never been recovered. One man in the other upturned zodiac also lost his life due to hyperthermia.

    I was only 32 when my dad died and I am turning 70 now so many years have passed. I apologise for not being able to put a name to the other 3 hunters that are a part of that horrible story. I guess that information was lost in the blur that I lived through following dad’s death. My Mom had come down to North Delta for some Christmas shopping with me while dad was off hunting. I will never forget having to turn around from the telephone to tell her that dad was gone. I know that she waited for years for the call that would tell her that dad’s body had been found but after a while that fear left her and she passed on Christmas day nine years ago having lived alone for almost 30 years.

    My 7 year old grandson is called Lincoln Murray and it occurred to me last night that we will have to share this story of his great grandfather with him at some point. With that idea in mind I sat down at the computer this morning and happened upon “Holberg.ca”. It felt good to share my dad’s story with you.

    Reply
    • Gary

      Anne, thank you for sharing your father’s story. I am sorry that it couldn’t have been a more positive outcome. But I am also glad that he got to spend so many happy years in the unforgettable Holberg. I hope your mother was able to heal and find some peace and happiness after his passing. And, of course, I am hoping the same for YOU now. All the best, Anne, in 2019 and the years ahead!

      Gary

      Reply

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